As a carer, the government tells me I’m valued. It sure doesn’t feel that way.

Today is Carers Rights Day. It seems everyone can agree that family carers need more support than they are getting, but no one can quite crack what that should look like. As many of us haven’t experienced the life of a full time carer, we thought Fiona’s story was quite compelling (and not a little angry-making). It’s longer than we normally publish, but it provides a look at a way of life that any of us might end up experiencing at some point in time. 

My name is Fiona Fisher, I live in Dunfermline on the East coast of Scotland with my ever excellent husband and three children. We have two lovely girls and our son, The Bold Joff, who is our middle child, has an ultra-rare, life-limiting and life-threatening genetic condition called Lowe Syndrome that causes a spectrum of problems, in the main, with the eyes, brain and kidneys. Boys with Lowe commonly die in their teens and twenties. We have a long and happy relationship with the Lowe Syndrome Association (LSA) in the USA, who have been invaluable in supporting us to know more about the syndrome, as well as providing emotional support and fostering scientific research into a possible cure one day.

Without hesitation, I will say that Joff is the easy bit of the equation. Fighting constantly at every stage of his life for good services and support has been simply brutal.

Continue reading As a carer, the government tells me I’m valued. It sure doesn’t feel that way.

“I love the interaction with people”: Samir Dawlatly, GP

A GP from Birmingham on what his job is really like, why many health problems are related to social problems , and the tricks he uses to keep himself at his best while connecting with patients all day long. 

If our model of general practice were not so familiar, it would sound more like a slightly sadistic game show format than a job. Continue reading “I love the interaction with people”: Samir Dawlatly, GP

First steps to thinking relationally

Take the first step in faith. You don’t have to see the whole staircase.

-Martin Luther King Jr

At Participle, we strongly believe that a 21st century welfare system must work relationally. (In fact we believe it so strongly, that’s what we’ve named our blog.) So what does that look like? Continue reading First steps to thinking relationally

Communication can be a sore subject… or is that sensitive?

We’ve been thinking a lot lately about what it takes to make a good relational worker – someone who can work with people to help them live the life they want. Whether you’re a social worker, a nurse, or in one of the many other kinds of roles helping people sort out problems, a big part of this is listening. At the same time, if you want to work together, you’ve also got to make sure they get what you’re saying too. Continue reading Communication can be a sore subject… or is that sensitive?

Great Interactions in Social Care: Nature plus Nurture

Across MacIntyre we use the slogan ‘It ain’t what you do, it’s the way that you do it’, to sum up our way of working. Social care is all about relationships. Continue reading Great Interactions in Social Care: Nature plus Nurture

The Living Wage: “It has made me happier and less isolated.”

Perrine works as a home care support worker. In her job, she needs to build relationships with her clients, so that she can understand and support them as well as she can. This type of work requires a lot of emotional labour, which is difficult to do if you are exhausted, hungry, or lacking in your own social support network. Here’s how being paid the Living Wage helps her do her best work and lead a better life, in her own words:  Continue reading The Living Wage: “It has made me happier and less isolated.”

Value workers, pay your fair share. It’s really not that hard.

Here at Participle we believe everyone who works deserves to be paid enough to live on. That’s the deal: you give your time and skills to us, we pay you enough to make it worth your while. It’s not a complicated concept and yet it appears to be one that hundreds and thousands of firms across the UK are confused by. Continue reading Value workers, pay your fair share. It’s really not that hard.