How to survive in a relational economy: give to get

Despite having jumped in with both feet, I’m new to Backr and didn’t quite get it the first time I heard about it. I heard it was a network that dealt with employability, and worked with Job Centres, but was for everybody that wanted to meet people and improve their careers. So I assumed that volunteering as a Backr contributor would involve helping people who are unemployed, and that sharing the particular skills I’ve picked up in my industry would be a major element. I wasn’t way off, but I would say it’s not really about that. Continue reading How to survive in a relational economy: give to get

How to survive in a relational economy: knowing is the first step

Kicking off our series on relational welfare and the jobs market is Emma Southgate, Head of Services for Backr. Here, she lays out the case for why the structure of our economy means we’ve got to start paying more attention to networks.

It’s not new. For years, perhaps thousands of years, people have found work through people they know.

Recommendations and reputation have long been vital in remaining in and making progress in work. What is new, or at least different from previous decades, is that these days four out of five jobs are never formally advertised. Continue reading How to survive in a relational economy: knowing is the first step

Relational debt relief: Making debt work for our communities

Every year councils, through high cost debt collection companies, chase outstanding tax/rent from people who unfortunately are not, and perhaps never will be, in any position to pay. Not only does this create cost within the system (chaser letters, county court judgements, court appearances etc), not only is the money recovered a fraction of the actual debt outstanding, but more importantly this grinds down households who may already be locked in a downward spiral and inevitably relying more heavily on the state because of their debt issues. Continue reading Relational debt relief: Making debt work for our communities

We all agree services need to be more collaborative, so what’s stopping us from doing it?

This morning Lord Victor Adebowale released an article calling for a more joined-up social care system. The story he outlines of Sam, whose family gradually disintegrates as repeated requests for help are met with fragmented, and ultimately counter-productive, responses from different services is sad but certainly not unusual. Continue reading We all agree services need to be more collaborative, so what’s stopping us from doing it?

Hilary Cottam on relational welfare, obligations and “fecklessness”

Here’s Participle’s Principle Partner Hilary Cottam being interviewed by Sue Goss of OPM on relational welfare. There’s lots of great nuggets in here- thoughts on the strivers vs. skivers dichotomy (“fecklessness”), what does the good life look like and how work feeds into it, and what our obligations are to each other as people, to name a few. We’ve ferreted out some of these best bits out for you in case you don’t have time to watch the whole thing. Continue reading Hilary Cottam on relational welfare, obligations and “fecklessness”

Crowdfunding and the relational economy: making it happen

In our last post, we talked about neighbourliness. There are lots of different ways that neighbourliness can manifest itself, and one of those is finding a connection with a great local business. Whether it’s a great coffee shop, butcher or even a local paper, these types of independent businesses can inspire a lot love, acting as community hubs and keeping money in the local economy. So what better way to show your support than by helping them to work their magic and create jobs in your neighbourhood? Continue reading Crowdfunding and the relational economy: making it happen